Gallery 2

20101 Corporal Harold Ackley of the 6th Battalion, King’s Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment):

He was killed in action on the 13 January 1917, aged 30 years, and he is commemorated on the Basra Memorial, Iraq.

Harold Ackley was born at Hyde in 1887 to William Ackley and Mary Ann Beswick who were married at St Peter’s Church, Oldham Road, Manchester, in 1878. He married Martha Ann Turner at St George’s Church, Abbey Hey, Manchester, in 1909. In 1911 he was resident with his wife on Cricket Street, Denton, employed as a general labourer at Joseph Howe & Sons Ltd, Amelia Street, Denton. The couple had a son, Harold (b. 1910, Gorton) and in 1911 he was staying with his widowed grandmother, Mary Ann, on Rylands Street, Gorton.

Following Harold Ackley’s death, his widow, Martha Ann, married William Littleton at St John’s Church, Hurst, Ashton-under-Lyne, in 1920 and they were resident on Queen Street, Hurst, Ashton-under-Lyne.
The Reverend Arthur Bamforth, a volunteer Army Chaplain with the Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA):

By the outbreak of war, Arthur Bamforth was the Minister at the United Free Methodist Church on Manchester Road, Denton, and he entered the Theatre of War in France on the 7 April 1916. Prior to going to France he visited wounded soldiers in Manchester hospitals and in France he visited them at clearing stations near the front line. For his work as a civilian he was awarded the British Medal.

Arthur Bamforth was born at Featherstone, Yorkshire West Riding, in 1874 to Edwin Bamforth and Jane Addey who were married at Pontefract, Yorkshire West Riding, in 1872. He married Martha Tyson at Guisborough, Yorkshire North Riding, in 1903. In 1911 he was resident with his wife and children in Dingle, Liverpool. He played cricket and football and he was a member of Denton Golf Club. In Denton he established the monthly People’s Service and the Pleasant Monday Evening Meeting for women.
9549 Private Alfred Bennett of the 2nd Battalion, Cheshire Regiment:

He was twice wounded in action but he survived the war.

He was a former regular soldier who served for three years in India before going to France after the outbreak of war.

He was resident on Greswell Street, Denton, and had worked at Denton Colliery and then for Sutton & Co who were general carriers in Ashworth Street, Denton.
352457 Private Edward Eric Birkby of the 2/9th (Ashton Territorials/Ashton Pals) Battalion, Manchester Regiment:

He was killed in action on the 9 October 1917, aged 20 years, and he is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium.

Edward Eric Birkby was born at Denton in 1897 to Ernest Birkby and Elizabeth Ferguson who were married at Ashton-under-Lyne in 1894. In 1911 he was resident with his parents and sister, Dorothy, on Manchester Road, Denton, still at school.
3340 Private Clarence Booth of the 1/9th (Ashton Territorials/Ashton Pals) Battalion, Manchester Regiment:

He entered the Theatre of War in the Dardanelles on the 22 October 1915 and he died of dysentery on the 8 December 1915, aged 19 years. He is buried in the Alexandria (Chatby) Military and War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt.

Clarence Booth was born at Denton in 1896 to Samuel William Booth and Elizabeth Barlow who were married at Ashton-under-Lyne in 1880. He was resident with his parents on Pearl Street, Denton.
7487 Lance Corporal William Burt of the 1st Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment (Prince of Wales’s):

He entered the Theatre of War in France on the 22 February 1915 and he died of wounds on the 4 May 1916, aged 22 years. He is buried in Bologne Eastern Cemetery, France.

In 1911, as a regular soldier, he was serving with the 4th Battalion, North Staffordshire Regiment, stationed at Whittington Barracks, Lichfield.

William Burt was born at Congleton, Cheshire, in 1893. He married Alice Taylor at St Anne’s Church, Haughton, Denton, in 1914 and they were resident on Moorside Lane, Haughton.
131391 Gunner Harry Catlow of the Royal Garrison Artillery:

He enlisted in the army at Ashton-under-Lyne on the 23 November 1917 and reported to No. 2 Depot of the Royal Garrison Artillery at Gosport, Hampshire, for training. He was then posted to No. 31 Anti-Aircraft Company on the 11 February 1917 and to No. 34 Anti-Aircraft Company on the 29 December 1917. These gun placements, mounted with 3-inch anti-aircraft guns, were in the vicinity of Dover Castle. Because of the crucial position of the castle overlooking the English Channel at the closest point to the French mainland it was chosen for the site of these guns to guard against air attack, especially by German Zeppelins. He was demobilised at Dover on the 15 February 1919.

Harry Catlow was born at Denton on the 13 February 1881 to Alfred Catlow and Mary Jane Bradbury who were married at St John’s Church, Manchester, in 1866. He married Mary Louisa Arrandale at the Unitarian Chapel, Wilton Street, Denton on the 10 August 1907. In 1911 he was resident with his wife and widowed mother-in-law, Louisa Arrandale née Bromley, on Law Street (no longer extant), Denton, employed as a warehouseman in the hatting industry. Their son, Herbert, was born at Denton on the 17 August 1912.

Following his demobilisation the Catlow family embarked on White Star Line Steamship, R.M.S. ‘Baltic’, at Liverpool on the 6 December 1919 bound for New York, USA.
40647 Private Ernest Collis of the Royal Army Medical Corps:

On one occasion he and a comrade were carrying a wounded soldier on a stretcher when they were struck by a shell that killed his comrade and the wounded soldier. He survived the war.

His brother, 4064 Private Sydney Collis of the 10th Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers, was killed in action at Vierstaat, south of Ypres, on the 5 September 1915, aged 24 years.

Ernest Collis was born at Denton in 1885 and he married Nellie Embley at Christ Church, Denton, in 1908. He was resident on Heaton Street and worked for Denton Urban District Council as well as being a member of the fire brigade.
18250 Lance Corporal John Condon MM of the 15th Battalion, Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment):

He was wounded in the head and arm on the 1 July 1916, the first day of the Battle of the Somme, where he was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field. He was killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Arras, 9 April 1917, aged 28 years. He is buried in Bailleul Road East Cemetery, France.

John Condon was born at London in 1889 and he married Evelyn Moores at Ashton-under-Lyne in 1913. The couple were resident on Hyde Road, Denton.

He was connected with St Mary’s Catholic Church on Duke Street, Denton. Prior to the war he worked in the dying department of Messrs James Bevan & Co, hat manufacturers.
4407 Private Fred Douglas of the Manchester Regiment:

He died at Denton on the 24 December 1918, aged 26 years, and his death is unrecorded by the CWGC.

Fred Douglas was born at Denton in 1892 to George Douglas and Emily Lowe who were married at the Ashton-under-Lyne District, in 1883. In 1911 he was resident with his parents and siblings on St John’s Road, off Frederick Street, Denton, employed in the hatting industry.
7948 Company Quartermaster Serjeant George Downs DCM, “B” Company, 1st Battalion, Cheshire Regiment:

He was awarded his DCM for gallantry in a trench near Ypres, Belgium. He continued to operate his machine gun after the trenches on his left flank had been evacuated, thus preventing the line from being broken. He showed great ability in working his gun throughout the encounter, and in so doing secured the line. He survived the war.

George Downs was born at Denton in 1884 to John Downs and Annie ‘Ann’ Taylor Downs who were married at St Mary’s Church, Stockport, in 1880. In 1901 he was resident with his parents and siblings on Mount Pleasant Road, Denton, employed in the hatting industry. Later his parents moved to Elizabeth Street.
987 Private Wilfred Eaton of the 1/6th Battalion (Hyde Territorials), Cheshire Regiment:

He entered the Theatre of War on the 10 November 1914 and was killed in action on the 26 February 1915, aged 21 years. He is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.

Wilfred Eaton (aka Wilfrid Eaton) was born at Denton in 1893 to Herbert Eaton and Edna Booth who were married at St Mark’s Church, Bredbury, in 1884. In 1911 he was resident with his parents and siblings on Hyde Road, Denton, employed as an apprentice hat finisher. His father died in 1913, aged 48 years, and his mother moved to Bentley Road.
12879 Serjeant Thomas Henry Grant of the 7th Battalion, King’s Own (Royal Lancaster Regiment):

He enlisted on the 31 August 1914 and entered the Theatre of War in France on the 17 July 1915 and was killed in action on the 7 July 1916, aged 41 years. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, France.

He served throughout the Battle of Loos without being injured.

Thomas Henry Grant was born at Gee Cross, Hyde, in 1875 to Thomas Henry Grant and Mary Barton who were married at St George's Church, Hyde, in 1867. He married Elizabeth Ann Harrison at St Mary’s Church, Newton in Mottram, in 1895. Thomas was survived by his wife and four children; Louis (b.1896 in Hyde), Bertha (b.1899 in Hyde), Florence (b.1901 in Hyde) and Mary (b.1907 in Denton).

He was employed as a coal miner at Denton Colliery and was resident on Peacock Street, off Ashton Road, Denton.
J/6892 Able Seaman Charles Evan Harbach:

At the outbreak of war he was serving on H.M.S. Monmouth, which sank after an action with a German cruiser off the Chilean Coast during the Battle of Coronel on Sunday, 1 November 1914.

He died, aged 21 years, and he is commemorated on Panel 1 of the Plymouth Naval Memorial. When H.M.S. Monmouth was sunk her entire crew was lost and among their number was Midshipman George Watson Muir, aged 15 years. He is commemorated on Panel 1 of the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

Charles Evan Harbach is the son of John Harbach and Ellen Williams and he was born at Withington, Manchester, on the 22 November 1892 and baptised at St Paul’s Church, Withington, on the 8 January 1893. Later the family moved to Manchester Road, Denton. At Denton he was a member of Hope Chapel Boys Brigade and he was also connected with St Anne’s Church, Haughton.

Charles Harbach was a regular in the Royal Navy and for some time he served on H.M.S. Highflyer. In 1911 he was serving on the cruiser H.M.S. Gibraltar that formed part of the Atlantic Fleet. The Commanding Officer was Captain Ernest F. A. Gaunt C.M.G. who was later promoted to Rear Admiral.
20217 Lance Serjeant Harold Hardy of the 3rd Battalion, Grenadier Guards:

He entered the Theatre of War in France on the 26 July 1915 and was killed in action on the 11 August 1918, aged 22 years. He is buried in Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery, France.

Harold Hardy was born at Hyde in 1896 to William Henry Hardy and Emma Jane Warren who were married at Holy Trinity Church, Gee Cross, Hyde, in 1890. He was resident with his parents on Farmers Fold, off Hyde Road, Haughton, on the banks of the river Tame.
14744 Lance Corporal James Horsfall of the 8th Battalion, South Lancashire Regiment:

He entered the Theatre of War on the 28 September 1915 and was killed in action on the 4 November 1915, aged 37 years. He is buried in Rifle House Cemetery, Belgium.

He was a regular in the army and had served during the South African War. While on the Western Front he served in the signalling section.

James Horsfall was born at Manchester in 1878 to Edwin B Horsfall and Ellen Grice who were married at Christ Church, Harpurhey, Manchester, in 1866. He married Ellen Wiseman at St George’s Church, Manchester, in 1903. He was survived by his wife and three children; Ellen (b.1904 in Ancoats), Madeline (b 1908 in Ancoats) and Thomas (b.1913 in Denton). The family was resident on Gibraltar Lane, Haughton Green, Denton.
GS/8784 Private Joseph Hough of the 1st Dragoons (The Royal Dragoons):

He entered the Theatre of War in France on the 19 May 1915 and was killed in action on the 5 June 1915, aged 36 years. He is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium.

He was a regular in the army and he served with the Imperial Yeomanry during the South African War. Subsequently, he joined a troop raised by Alfred Hopkinson of Ryecroft Hall, Audenshaw, before transferring to the dragoons.

Joseph was born at Ardwick, Manchester, in 1879 and he married Emily Meadowcroft at St Silas’s Church, Ardwick, in 1903. Their first two children died in infancy but at the time of his death he was survived by his wife and three children; Arthur (b.1909 at Ardwick), Harry (b.1911 at Denton) and Alice (b.1913 at Denton). In 1911 he was resident with his wife and family on Two Trees Lane, Denton, employed as a carter for a tripe dresser.
7393 Private Leo Sebastian Mallalieu of the 16th Battalion, Manchester Regiment:

He enlisted in the army on the 10 January 1915 and after training he was posted to France, arriving on the 8 November 1915. He was killed in action on the 1 July 1916, the first day of the Battle of the Somme, aged 20 years, and he is buried in Dantzig Alley British Cemetery, France.

Leo Sebastian Mallalieu was born at Denton in 1895 to Thomas Mallalieu and Agnes Mary Robbins who were married at Ashton-under-Lyne in 1879. His mother died at Denton in 1895, aged 41 years, and his father married Margaret Jane Burns at Cardiff in 1896. In 1911 he was resident with his father, stepmother and siblings on Peel Street, Denton, employed as a butcher. He was connected with St Mary’s Catholic Church on Duke Street, Denton. Before the war he was working for the Agenta Meat Co of Hyde. His father was a Denton Councillor and General Secretary of the Felt Hatters & Trimmers Unions.
745029 Driver James Maude of the Royal Field Artillery, formerly Service No. 69:

He entered the Theatre of War in Egypt on the 25 November 1915 and he died in England on the 1 January 1918, aged 25 years. He is buried on the east side of Christ Church, Denton, and is commemorated on a special memorial near the church entrance.

James Maude was born at Denton in 1892 to Ernest Albert Maude and Elizabeth Richardson who were married at St Mark’s Church, Bredbury, in 1883. In 1911 he was resident with his parents and siblings on Holland Street, Denton, employed as an apprentice hatter. His father died in 1911, aged 49 years.

James’s brother served in the army as 12579 Acting Bombardier (formerly Gunner) George Maude of the Royal Field Artillery. He entered the Theatre of War in Egypt on the 20 July 1915 and he was demobilised.
81482 Sapper George Middlemiss of the 202nd Field Company, Royal Engineers:

He entered the Theatre of War in France on the 10 November 1915 and was killed in action on the 23 May 1916, aged 36 years. He is buried in the Cerisy-Gailly Military Cemetery, France.

George Middlemiss was born at Galashiels, Peebleshire, Scotland, in c.1880 to Thomas Kerr Middlemiss and Isabella. He married Frances Bilton at St Thomas’s Church, Hyde, in January 1914 and the couple had one child, George, who was born at Denton on the 13 November 1914. He was resident with his wife and child on St Anne’s Road, on the corner with Hyde Road, Denton, employed as a stone mason at Trafford Park and then on Derby Street, Manchester.

It seems that Francis Bilton was the second wife of George Middlemiss, the first being Hannah Sophia Nelson who was born at Sutton, Hull, Yorkshire, in 1877. They were married at Govan, Lanarkshire, Scotland, on the 31 March 1899 and in 1901 they were resident at Ford Place, Salford. They had one child, Neil, who was born at Salford Greengate on the 27 November 1901 and died on the 11 July 1902 at Kinning Park, Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland.
17172 Private Wilfred Stanley Moores of “A” Company, 20th Battalion, Manchester Regiment:

He entered the Theatre of War in France on the 9 November 1915 and was killed in action on the 1 July 1916, aged 19 years. He is buried in the Dantzig Alley British Cemetery, France.

Wilfred Stanley Moores was born at Haughton Green, Denton, in 1896 to Albert Henry Moores and Sarah Middleton who were married at Ashton-under-Lyne in 1893. In 1901 he was resident with his parents and sister, Eva, on Gibraltar Lane, Haughton Green, and in 1911 he was resident with his widowed mother, sister, Eva, and three boarders on Corporation Street, Hyde, employed as an apprentice letterpress printer.
235725 Corporal John Richard Purcer of the East Lancashire Regiment, formerly Private 1874 of the 9th (Ashton Territorials/Ashton Pals) Battalion, Manchester Regiment:

He enlisted in the army at Ashton-under-Lyne on the 23 February 1914 and in July 1914 he was attached to “G” Company of the 9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, with the rank of Private. He entered the Theatre of War at British East Africa, German East Africa, Rhodesia and Uganda, on the 25 September 1914. At some point he transferred to the East Lancashire Regiment. He survived the war and at demobilisation he held the rank of Corporal.

John Richard Purcer was born at Oldham, Lancashire, in 1897 to John Richard Purcer and Ellen Price who were married at St John’s Church, Oldham, in 1895. In 1911 he was resident with his parents and siblings on Charles Street, Denton, employed as an apprentice at Cooke Brothers (Denton) Ltd of Moorfield Hat Works, Manchester Road, Denton. He was also a student at evening school.
18068 Private Harry Williams of the 20th Battalion, Manchester Regiment:

He enlisted on the 17 October 1914 (his birthday) and he entered the Theatre of War in France on the 9 November 1915. He was killed in action on the 23 April 1916, aged 24 years. He is buried in Citadel New Military Cemetery, France.

Harry Williams was born at Denton on the 17 October 1892 and he is the only son of Samuel Henry Williams and Martha Ann Hampshire who were married at Ashton-under-Lyne in 1882. In 1911 he was resident with his parents and sister, Carrie, on Highfield Street, Denton, employed as a warehouseman in the hatting industry. A later residence was on Clare Street.
22556 Private Robert Lawrence Wilson of the 23rd Battalion, Manchester Regiment:

He died of illness at home on the 28 November 1915, aged 21 years, and he is buried in Gorton Cemetery, Manchester.

Robert Lawrence Wilson was born at Gorton in 1894 to James Wilson and Amanda Theresa Mooney who were married at Barton-on-Irwell, Manchester, in 1883. In 1911 he was resident with his parents and siblings on Napier Street, Gorton, employed as an iron worker. A later residence was on Town Lane, Denton.
350274 Serjeant Thomas Winded of the 9th (Ashton Territorials/Ashton Pals) Battalion, Manchester Regiment, formerly Serjeant 1550:

After enlisting in the army at Ashton-under-Lyne he was attached to “E” Company with the rank of Corporal in July 1914. He entered the Theatre of War at Gallipoli (Dardanelles) on the 9 May 1915 with the rank of Serjeant. He survived the war and he was demobilised on the 25 January 1919.

Thomas Winded was born at Denton in 1893 to Alfred James Winded and Mary Ingham. In 1911 he was resident with his parents, sister, Marion (b. 1895, Denton), brother, Charles Arthur (b. 1897, Denton) and sister, Frances (b. 1906, Denton), on Osborne Road, Denton, employed as a student teacher.
1436 Private Albert Wood of the 2nd Battalion, Manchester Regiment:

He entered the Theatre of War on the 14 April 1915 and died of wounds on the 16 May 1915, aged 24 years. He is buried in the Divisional Cemetery, Belgium.

Albert Wood was born at Denton in 1891 to Samuel Wood and Rachel Reece who were married at Ashton-under-Lyne in 1878. In 1911 he was resident with his parents on Emily Street, Oldham, employed as a mule spinner piecer at a cotton mill. He married Miriam Emily Walton at St Paul’s Church, Oldham, in 1913. Following his death his widow married William Woolley at Ashton-under-Lyne District in 1916 and they were resident on Quail Street, New Earth Street, Oldham.
1035 Private James Yearsley of the 2nd Company, 1st Battalion, Welsh Guards, formerly 23216 of the Grenadier Guards:

His medal card records his army rank as Lance Corporal.

He entered the Theatre of War in France on the 16 September 1915 and he died of wounds/illness on the 11 September 1916, aged 18 years, and he is buried in the Corbie Communal Cemetery Extension, France.

James Yearsley was born at Denton in 1897 to Alfred William Yearsley and Elizabeth Bailey who were married at Ashton-under-Lyne in 1892. In 1911 he was resident with his parents and siblings on Belgrave Street, Denton, employed as a green grocer’s boy. Later he was in the employ of Messrs Wilde & Booth, hat manufacturers. By the end of the war the family was resident on Lyndhurst Avenue.
33267 Private Harry Yearsley of the 4th (Queen’s Own) Hussars:

At the outbreak of war the 4th Hussars were based on The Curragh, County Kildare, Ireland. In August 1914 they entered the Theatre of War in France as part of the 3rd Cavalry Brigade in the 2nd Cavalry Division for service on the Western Front. Here they took part in the Great Retreat in September 1914, the First Battle of Ypres in October 1914 and the Second Battle of Ypres in April 1915. They also helped to halt the German advance at the Battle of Moreuil Wood in March 1918. This conflict that saw their commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel John Evelyn Carmichael Darley, killed in action on the 31 March 1918, aged 38 years. Harry Yearsley survived the war to be demobilised.

Harry Yearsley is the brother of the above James Yearsley and he was born at Denton in 1899. A third brother is 735698 Gunner Alfred William Yearsley of the Royal Field Artillery. He was born at Denton in 1895 and he survived the war to be demobilised.

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